Compiling Dynamic Modules for NGINX Plus

NGINX Plus Release R11 introduces binary compatibility for dynamic modules. This article describes the build process, explaining how to compile third‑party NGINX modules so that they can be used in the NGINX Plus product. NGINX Modules Overview NGINX modules are written in C and conform to the API described in Extending NGINX on the NGINX Wiki. There is a… Continue reading ›

Announcing NGINX Plus R11

We are excited to announce the availability of NGINX Plus Release 11 (R11). With this release we are providing a number of new features in NGINX Plus to make the product easier to extend and customize, and to support an even broader range of deployments. NGINX Plus R11 introduces binary compatibility for dynamic modules. This means that dynamic modules that have… Continue reading ›

What’s New in NGINX Plus R10?

This post is adapted from a webinar by Owen Garrett, Head of Products at NGINX, Inc. Table of Contents 0:00 Introduction 0:34 NGINX Plus R9 Recap 2:34 NGINX Plus R10 New Features 3:01 ModSecurity WAF 6:03 Why ModSecurity? 7:12 ModSecurity 101 8:49 Comprehensive Protection for Critical Apps and Data 9:37 NGINX Plus with ModSecurity WAF Details 12:44 Why NGINX Plus with ModSecurity WAF?… Continue reading ›

nginx.conf 2016 Keynote by Owen Garrett: NGINX: Past, Present, and Future

This post is adapted from the keynote, NGINX: Past, Present, and Future, delivered at nginx.conf 2016 by Owen Garrett, Head of Products at NGINX, Inc. More blog posts and videos from other presentations at the conference will be published in the coming months. Table of Contents 0:00 Introduction 0:44 NGINX Conference Two Years Ago 1:39 12 Years of NGINX… Continue reading ›

IP Transparency and Direct Server Return with NGINX and NGINX Plus as Transparent Proxy

This blog post describes how to configure the open source NGINX software or NGINX Plus as a "transparent" proxy for traffic to upstream servers. It explains how you can use a transparent proxy to spoof the source IP address of packets to implement IP Transparency, and how you can implement a load‑balancing mode called Direct Server Return for… Continue reading ›

High‑Performance Caching with NGINX and NGINX Plus

This post is adapted from a webinar by Owen Garrett, introduced by Andrew Alexeev. Table of Contents Introduction 0:00 Introduction 1:22 About This Webinar 2:17 Basic Principles of Content Caching 2:35 Basic Principles 3:59 Mechanics of HTTP Caching 7:46 What Does NGINX Cache? Content Caching and NGINX 9:55 NGINX in Operation 10:06 NGINX Config 11:14 Caching… Continue reading ›

Announcing NGINX Plus R10

We are excited to announce NGINX Plus Release 10 (R10), our most significant release yet. NGINX Plus extends the open source NGINX software with advanced functionality and award‑winning support, providing customers with a complete application delivery solution. With this release we are providing a number of new features to dramatically improve the security and performance of applications delivered by… Continue reading ›

Choosing the Right Load Balancer on Amazon: AWS Application Load Balancer vs. NGINX Plus

Anyone running highly available, scalable applications on Amazon Web Services (AWS) now can choose between load balancing with NGINX or NGINX Plus; AWS Elastic Load Balancer, now called Classic Load Balancer; and the new Application Load Balancer, described by Amazon as an option for Elastic Load Balancing. The new option is described in a blog post… Continue reading ›

The Imperva HTTP/2 Vulnerability Report and NGINX

On August 3, Imperva – an Internet security company – announced four potential security vulnerabilities in the HTTP/2 protocol, and issued a detailed report evaluating a number of web servers against these vulnerabilities. As shown in the table (from page 19 of the Imperva report), NGINX 1.9.9 performed comparatively well in Imperva’s tests, and was not affected by three of… Continue reading ›

Mitigating the HTTPoxy Vulnerability with NGINX

On July 18th, a vulnerability named ‘HTTPoxy’ was announced, affecting some server‑side web applications that run in CGI or CGI‑like environments, such as some FastCGI configurations. Languages known to be affected so far include PHP, Python, and Go. A number of CVEs have been assigned, covering specific languages and CGI implementations: Apache HTTP Server (CVE-2016-5387)… Continue reading ›